The Monstrous Economy: PhD Thesis Extract

Earlier this year I was awarded a PhD in Cultural History from the University of Portsmouth. My PhD research examined middle-class guilt as a motivation for the creation, and promotion of monster stereotypes for socially outcast 'others' in Britain during the nineteenth century. I've created an abridged version here, but if you'd like to read the full thesis, get in touch.

A String of Golden Bells: Everyday Synaesthesia #47.

This is a post I just published on a blog I occasionally update, all about my experience of living with a condition called synaesthesia.  *********************************************************************************** No rules. No routine. I am woken every morning by the sound of my alarm clock. That sounds perfectly normal. Except it isn’t my alarm clock at all, it’s me. …

Continue reading A String of Golden Bells: Everyday Synaesthesia #47.

Conference Review: The Fabled Coast: Coastal and Maritime Folklore, Superstitions and Customs.

This post was originally published on the Supernatural Cities website.  Held over 27th & 28th April 2019, the Fabled Coast conference was a multi-centre event celebrating “the unfathomable deep” and its rich, global history of myths and legends. Organised by the Sussex Centre for Fairy Tales, Fantasy, and Speculative Fiction at the University of Chichester, the first day of …

Continue reading Conference Review: The Fabled Coast: Coastal and Maritime Folklore, Superstitions and Customs.

Everyday Synaesthesia: Podcasts, coping, & lilacs.

For an archive of my synaesthesia related posts see my blog Everyday Synaesthesia.  On podcasts, coping, and lilacs.  I haven't posted on Everday Synaesthesia in a while, I suppose because I've been busy with my PhD. Also, because I went through a phase there of being a bit embarrassed to talk about my synaesthesia stuff. …

Continue reading Everyday Synaesthesia: Podcasts, coping, & lilacs.